Global inequality

What is inequality and how does it affect global business? A curation of resources on the topic is listed here.
Where are the world’s most unequal countries?  |  The world bank data on the Gini index  shows income inequality |  An empirical evidence of how inequality between incomes has changed over time, and how the levels of inequality in different countries is also useful to explore the topic | Inequality-adjusted Human Development Index  which combines a country’s average achievements in health, education and income with how those achievements are distributed among country’s population by “discounting” each dimension’s average value according to its level of inequality can be accessed on the UNDP page |

Doing Business in Kazakhstan 2017

Doing Business in Kazakhstan 2017 is the first report of the subnational Doing Business series in Kazakhstan. It measures business regulations and their enforcement in six regions (oblasts)—Aktobe, East Kazakhstan, Karagandy, Kostanay, Pavlodar and South Kazakhstan, each represented by its largest business city (Aktobe, Oskemen, Karagandy, Kostanay, Pavlodar and Shymkent)—as well as Almaty city and the capital city, Astana. Read more 

 

How Do FTAs Affect Exporting Firms in Thailand?

Thailand—an outward-oriented regional production hub—is one of East Asia’s most active users of free trade agreements (FTAs) as an instrument of commercial policy. By December 2009, Thailand had 11 concluded FTAs, and more were either under negotiation or proposed. Thai trade negotiators have striven to secure market access via FTAs, but little is known on how FTAs actually affect exporting firms. A survey of 221 exporters in leading sectors forms the basis for the first systematic study of the business impact of FTAs in Thailand. Key findings are as follows: (i) 24.9% of respondents used Thai FTAs as of 2007–2008, and this figure seems set to rise; (ii) 45.9% of respondents said that FTAs had influenced their business plans; (iii) 26.2% of firms felt that dealing with multiple rules of origin adds to business costs, and this is estimated to be less than 1% of export sales; (iv) more than half the sample firms have consulted with government and business associations on FTAs; and (v) a significant demand existed for business development services to adjust to FTAs, particularly for small and medium enterprises (SMEs). The findings suggest that Thailand should refine its FTA strategy to take better advantage of regional trade agreements. The study concludes with specific recommendations to improve business awareness of FTAs, encourage greater utilization of FTA preferences, increase competitiveness of local firms, and mitigate the potential effect of multiple rules of origin.

Doing Business Economy Profile 2016 : Ethiopia

This economy profile for Doing Business 2016 presents the 11 Doing Business indicators for Ethiopia. To allow for useful comparison, the profile also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2016 is the 13th edition in a series of annual reports measuring the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Economies are ranked on their ease of doing business; for 2015 Ethiopia ranks 146. A high ease of doing business ranking means the regulatory environment is more conducive to the starting and operation of a local firm. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulations and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 189 economies from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe and over time. Doing Business sheds light on how easy or difficult it is for a local entrepreneur to open and run a small to medium-size business when complying with relevant regulations. It measures and tracks changes in regulations affecting 11 areas in the life cycle of a business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting minority investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts, resolving insolvency and labor market regulation. The data in this report are current as of June 1, 2015 (except for the paying taxes indicators, which cover the period from January to December 2014). Click here for more information 
Citation
“World Bank Group. 2015. Doing Business Economy Profile 2016 : Ethiopia. World Bank, Washington, DC. © World Bank. https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/23095 License: CC BY 3.0 IGO.”
 

Doing Business Economy Profile 2016 : Costa Rica

his economy profile for Doing Business 2016 presents the 11 Doing Business indicators for Costa Rica. To allow for useful comparison, the profile also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2016 is the 13th edition in a series of annual reports measuring the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Economies are ranked on their ease of doing business; for 2015 Costa Rica ranks 58.A high ease of doing business ranking means the regulatory environment is more conducive to the starting and operation of a local firm. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulations and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 189 economies from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe and over time. Doing Business sheds light on how easy or difficult it is for a local entrepreneur to open and run a small to medium-size business when complying with relevant regulations. It measures and tracks changes in regulations affecting 11 areas in the life cycle of a business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting minority investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts, resolving insolvency and labor market regulation. The data in this report are current as of June 1, 2015 (except for the paying taxes indicators, which cover the period from January to December 2014). Click here 
Citation
“World Bank Group. 2015. Doing Business Economy Profile 2016 : Costa Rica. World Bank, Washington, DC. © World Bank. https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/23067 License: CC BY 3.0 IGO.”

Doing Business Economy Profile 2016 : Brazil

This economy profile for Doing Business 2016 presents the 11 Doing Business indicators for Brazil. To allow for useful comparison, the profile also provides data for other selected economies (comparator economies) for each indicator. Doing Business 2016 is the 13th edition in a series of annual reports measuring the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. Economies are ranked on their ease of doing business; for 2015 Brazil ranks 116. A high ease of doing business ranking means the regulatory environment is more conducive to the starting and operation of a local firm. Doing Business presents quantitative indicators on business regulations and the protection of property rights that can be compared across 189 economies from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe and over time. Doing Business sheds light on how easy or difficult it is for a local entrepreneur to open and run a small to medium-size business when complying with relevant regulations. It measures and tracks changes in regulations affecting 11 areas in the life cycle of a business: starting a business, dealing with construction permits, getting electricity, registering property, getting credit, protecting minority investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts, resolving insolvency and labor market regulation. The data in this report are current as of June 1, 2015 (except for the paying taxes indicators, which cover the period from January to December 2014). Click here 
Citation
“World Bank Group. 2015. Doing Business Economy Profile 2016 : Brazil. World Bank, Washington, DC. © World Bank. https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/23041 License: CC BY 3.0 IGO.”