How Do FTAs Affect Exporting Firms in Thailand?

Thailand—an outward-oriented regional production hub—is one of East Asia’s most active users of free trade agreements (FTAs) as an instrument of commercial policy. By December 2009, Thailand had 11 concluded FTAs, and more were either under negotiation or proposed. Thai trade negotiators have striven to secure market access via FTAs, but little is known on how FTAs actually affect exporting firms. A survey of 221 exporters in leading sectors forms the basis for the first systematic study of the business impact of FTAs in Thailand. Key findings are as follows: (i) 24.9% of respondents used Thai FTAs as of 2007–2008, and this figure seems set to rise; (ii) 45.9% of respondents said that FTAs had influenced their business plans; (iii) 26.2% of firms felt that dealing with multiple rules of origin adds to business costs, and this is estimated to be less than 1% of export sales; (iv) more than half the sample firms have consulted with government and business associations on FTAs; and (v) a significant demand existed for business development services to adjust to FTAs, particularly for small and medium enterprises (SMEs). The findings suggest that Thailand should refine its FTA strategy to take better advantage of regional trade agreements. The study concludes with specific recommendations to improve business awareness of FTAs, encourage greater utilization of FTA preferences, increase competitiveness of local firms, and mitigate the potential effect of multiple rules of origin.

Wallis and Futuna

Wallis and Futuna, officially the Territory of the Wallis and Futuna Islands (/ˈwɒlɪs/ and /fˈtnə/; French: Wallis-et-Futuna or Territoire des îles Wallis-et-Futuna, Fakauvea and Fakafutuna: Uvea mo Futuna), is a French island collectivity in the South Pacific between Tuvalu to the northwest, Fiji to the southwest, Tonga to the southeast, Samoa to the east, and Tokelau to the northeast. Though both French and Polynesian, Wallis and Futuna is distinct from the entity known as French Polynesia.

 

Source: Wikipedia

Furniture Industry in Kenya : Situational Analysis and Strategy

The Government of Kenya recognizes that the performance of the furniture sector is crucial both to employment and growth in the country. The Ministry of Industrialization and Enterprise Development (MOIED) therefore requested an analysis of both the furniture and timber sectors, in order to understand their current state of development, their main constraints, and the interventions necessary to accelerate their growth. The objective of this report is to provide a comprehensive value-chain analysis of the Kenyan furniture industry, including the timber sub-sector, in order to assess policy options available to the MOIED and recommend critical interventions to stimulate the industry’s development. By situating Kenya’s furniture industry within the global and regional context, this paper also aims to identify ways in which to boost Kenya’s competiveness in the East African markets and beyond. The analysis in this report is largely focused on the wooden furniture sector (versus plastics, composites, and other furniture). The bulk of Kenya’s furniture industry is focused on wood, and Kenya has a competitive advantage in wood relative to South Africa, Asian countries, and Europe, which have very competitive value chains in furniture made from other materials.Read report here
Source
“Creapo Oy; World Bank Group. 2015. Furniture Industry in Kenya : Situational Analysis and Strategy. World Bank, Washington, DC. © World Bank. https://openknowledge.worldbank.org/handle/10986/22973 License: CC BY 3.0 IGO.”